A TSH (Thyroid Stimulating Hormone) test is commonly used to help evaluate a person’s thyroid function and aid in the diagnosis of thyroid disorders such as hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism. It may also be used in some cases to evaluate pituitary gland function that helps control the body’s metabolism, temperature, and heart rate.
Common symptoms of thyroid disorders include but are not limited to anxiety, irregular weight gain or loss, insomnia, diarrhea, constipation, irritation or sensitivity in the eyes, increased heart rate, dry skin, hair loss, and menstrual irregularity in women.
A TSH test is a common general health screening. It can also be ordered when someone is experiencing symptoms associated with thyroid disorders or to monitor treatment for a thyroid disorder. Women experiencing fertility issues often have their TSH tested.

Note:
It is recommended that someone taking Biotin (also known as vitamin B7 or B8, vitamin H, or coenzyme R) stop consumption at least 72 hours prior to the collection of a sample.
Specimen collection after fluorescein dye angiography should be delayed for at least 3 days. For people on hemodialysis, specimen collection should be delayed for 2 weeks.
The thyroid Screen blood test does NOT require fasting.

Important Blood Collection Information

Improper collection of blood specimens may affect laboratory results. Carefully read and follow the collection instructions. Persons with hemophilia or anti-coagulation therapy should consult a licensed physician or healthcare professional before using this kit.

Physician Review

All results are review by a licensed physician in your state prior to release. Urgent issues are uncommon with wellness testing. However, based on medical judgment and standard protocols, a physician will communicate directly with the user regarding what a concerning result is and the most appropriate intervention.